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Fuentepinilla

Tourism |  Additional Information |  Heritage |  Where to stay |  Where to eat |  What to do

Fuentepinilla is located in the centre of the province, about 35 kilometres away from the capital, in the crossroads between many towns such as Berlanga, Almazán, Calatañazor and Tajueco.

 

Around the town, there are many hills where you can find medicinal and aromatic herbs such as thyme and chamomile, reason why Fuentepinilla had an apothecary in the 18th century. Also in autumn, many mycological species grow in these lands, and in this territory, the Fuentepinilla River runs with water coming from springs such as Ojo de la Torre.

 

The first settlers in the area established themselves in the mountain pass of San Miguel. Some remains of pottery that were found there can be dated back to the First Iron Age. The Pax Romana made it that these strategic settlements lost their importance, so the villagers began to settle at the bottom of the hill. Later, in this same spot, there was a Celtic fort with piled rocks. After that came the Romans, the Visigoths and the Muslims: centuries of history and culture that weren’t documented until 1089.

 

Fuentepinilla’s heritage is varied and rich. Concerning its religious architecture, there is the church of San Juan Bautista. Among its civil architecture, there is a Roman bridge (with some stonecutter’s marks that match the ones on the church’s façade), the gateway to the village which is emblazoned, many coats of arms and a pillory.

 

The Palace of the Counts of Aguilar (Palacio de los Condes de Aguilar) is a Gothic building that was built in 1529. It is considered as one of the most beautiful and representative examples of Gothic stately homes in the province. What stands out is the decoration around the main entrance which is framed with a carved alfiz as Gothic tableaus. Two enormous coat of arms complete the palace’s façade.

 

Part of the walled gate of the town (puerta amurallada de la villa) still stands. It is an ashlar archway that was built with thick keystones. On both sides of the exterior part of the wall, there are coats of arms of Counts of Aguilar that shed light upon their noble power.

 

The 16th-century Renaissance pillory was placed when Fuentepinilla was granted the Burg status. It is placed on an Attica base which is also on a circular basement, with a plain column consisting of two segments, and a simple capital that has marks as if it had had hooks.

 

The medieval bridge called Puente de las Cabras, has a tall central arch that crosses the Fuentepinilla River with straight parapets. On either side there are small triangular buttresses that strengthen the entire structure.

 

The Museum of La Fragua is currently being restored.

 

Among Fuentepinilla’s famous figures is Gervasio Manrique (1891-1978), born in Osona. Throughout his fruitful life, he was a teacher, journalist, ethnologist and literary expert who wrote mostly about Soria. Gervasio Manrique would sign his works with the surnames Manrique de Lara.

Tourist Map

View Tourist Map
View Tourist Map
Tourist Map
Roman bridge
Roman bridge
Palace of the Counts of Aguilar
Palace of the Counts of Aguilar
Details of the homes
Details of the homes
Pillory
Pillory

Diputación de Soria (Desarrollo Económico y Turismo)

C/ Caballeros, 17 - 42002 Soria

Tfno. 975 220 511 Fax 975 231 635

turismo@dipsoria.es