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Arcos de Jalón

Tourism |  Additional Information |  Heritage |  Where to stay |  Where to eat |  What to do

Located in the south-western part of the province is Arcos de Jalón, a village distributes the water coming from the Ebro river to the rest of the land and that takes its name from the Jalón River which comes from the Agudillo Hill in the mountain range Sierra Ministra located a few kilometres to the south-east. The Jalón River levels out the land and is located in the canyon between Lodares and Somaén that leads to Aragon. This river is one of the most important tributaries that leads into the Ebro River. The Jalón River runs through Cenozoic land with soft hills and small valleys that the rivers and springs formed, and some seasonal lagoons such as the Judes Lagoon.

 

To the south, along the GR-86 footpath there are two natural spaces included in the eco-network, Red Natura 2000: the Juniper of Jalón (Sabinares de Jalón) and the Layna Wilderness (Páramo de Layna), and between these two spots there are vast cereal fields and grasslands where you can find small mammals and steppic birds, some of them of great ornithological importance such as the Dupont’s lark.

Arcos de Jalón is located in the natural pathway between the plateau and the Ebro Valley and the many cultures and civilizations that throughout history lived in the northern part of the Iberian Peninsula, chose to settle in these lands and left their mark on this region. Many archaeological sites have been found in the area and show remains of civilizations ranging from the Palaeolithic era to the Bell-Beaker culture, the Bronze Age and the Iron Age. The people who live in Arcos de Jalón are called Arcobrigenses, due to the Celtiberian settlement called Arcóbriga, only a few kilometres away from the village. Following the valley was the XXIV Roman road called Antonine Itinerary that lead from Emerita Augusta (currently called Mérida) and Cesaraugusta (Zaragoza).

 

Some findings suggest the presence of Visigoths in the area that, during the Caliphate period, was part of the border separating the caliphate of Córdoba from the rest of the Iberian Peninsula. Land where El Cid would ride his horse, where the first Christian conquests began and where the clash of La Raya took place. An example of this period is the castle which is located in the highest part of the village, and the church Iglesia de la Asunción de Nuestra Señora that still maintains its original walls with a Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque style.

 

In the 19th century, a railroad was built in the town, connecting it with many other towns and turning it into a very important communications hub. At the station, you can still see one of the few steam locomotives that were built in Spain. One of these examples is La Mikado, manufactured in Bilbao by the Compañía Euskalduna.

Tourist Map

View Tourist Map
View Tourist Map
Tourist Map
River in Arcos de Jalón
River in Arcos de Jalón
View of Arcos de Jalón from the castle
View of Arcos de Jalón from the castle
Church of Nuestra Señora de la Asunción
Church of Nuestra Señora de la Asunción
Steam locomotive in Arcos de Jalón
Steam locomotive in Arcos de Jalón

Diputación de Soria (Desarrollo Económico y Turismo)

C/ Caballeros, 17 - 42002 Soria

Tfno. 975 220 511 Fax 975 231 635

turismo@dipsoria.es