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Andaluz

Tourism |  Additional Information |  Heritage |  Where to stay |  Where to eat |  What to do

This town is located on the southern side of an opening formed by the Andaluz River. This river ends up at the Douro River next to a medieval bridge built in ashlar stone with six-pointed openings and cutwaters at the front.

 

During the Middle Ages, Andaluz was the leader of its Community of Burgs and Land and was the guardian of the strategic bridge and pathway that border the Douro River. They defended this path with a castle that no longer stands. However, the base of the castle is still visible and some historians say the fortress had a rectangular floor plan with a keep and a water pool. Al-Mansur and the Castilian paramilitary forces most likely used this path on their way to raid the Douro’s “Extremadura”.

 

In 1089, during the reign of Alfonso VI, Andaluz was granted its own jurisdiction thanks to a document that is the earliest and best-preserved in the entire province. There is a copy from the 13th century in the Archives of the Cathedral of El Burgo de Osma.

 

Andaluz had two Romanesque churches: the church of Nuestra Señora de la Calle, which now blends in with the rest of the village and only maintains the stonework sanctuary, and the church of San Miguel which is located in the highest point of the middle of the village and is considered Heritage of Cultural Interest since 1944.

 

When Pascual Madoz described the village in the Geographical, Historical and Statistical Dictionary in the 19th century, he said that Andaluz had 109 inhabitants, though nowadays that number is significantly smaller. However, the locals still dedicate their lives to livestock production and agriculture as they did back in the day. Madoz speaks of the fertile lands near the riverbanks and the plantations of grains, vegetable gardens and orchards. Regarding livestock production, sheep, cows, horses and mules are the most common animals. On the other hand, wild animals can be hunted in the area, such as partridges and rabbits, and it is quite common to fish trout, eels, catfish and crayfish in the rivers. Nowadays the Douro River and its effluents are natural protected areas due to the abundance of flora and fauna that form this ecosystem.

 

The inhabitants of Andaluz built their homes with materials that the land provided them: limestone, soil that was used to make adobe and wood from the holm oak and juniper groves in the mountains.

Tourist Map

View Tourist Map
View Tourist Map
Tourist Map
Landscape of Andaluz
Landscape of Andaluz
Medieval bridge
Medieval bridge
Church of San Miguel Arcángel
Church of San Miguel Arcángel

Diputación de Soria (Desarrollo Económico y Turismo)

C/ Caballeros, 17 - 42002 Soria

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turismo@dipsoria.es